Apple Cider Vinegar for Amazing Health

Whenever the skin on my hands becomes overly dry and irritated, I can tell that my gut needs a little help. In addition to increasing my water intake, I have started drinking apple cider vinegar again. I drink one tablespoon of Bragg apple cider vinegar—organic, raw, and made with “mother” enzymes”—in one cup of water before breakfast and lunch. Apple Cider Vinegar has many amazing uses—below are three of my favorites!

Bacteria Killer

In the time of Hippocrates and The Old Testament, apple cider vinegar and honey were used to fight infection and to clean skin wounds. According to one clinical study, apple cider vinegar has antimicrobial effects on E-coli, S. aureus, and C. albicans. It can help the body get rid of bad bacteria in the gut. A healthier gut leads to a healthier you!

Diabetes Fighter

Vinegar helps to lower blood glucose in people that have type 2 diabetes or people that are at-risk of developing type 2 diabetes. One study showed that a change in diet and one tablespoon of vinegar twice per day led to a greater decrease in fasting blood glucose than daily rosiglitazone or metformin use.

Weight Loss Helper

In one study, researchers concluded that apple cider vinegar reduced the risk of obesity in rats. In another study that lasted for 12 weeks, obese human subjects that consumed 15 mL or 30 mL of vinegar had significantly lower weight, body mass index, visceral fat, waist circumference, and triglyceride levels than subjects that did not consume vinegar.

Before you decide to consume apple cider vinegar, you might want to consult with your healthcare professional. Also, be sure to dilute it in water and do not overdo it. Over-consumption can lead to stomach upset, erosion of the enamel of your teeth, a decrease in your potassium level, and other unwanted effects.

What do you think of this natural remedy?

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Give Milk Thistle A Try

Have you ever heard of milk thistle? A few years ago, I started taking milk thistle for help with detoxification and breastfeeding. Some people believe that milk thistle is a galactagogue (it might increase the flow of breastmilk). Honestly, it’s difficult to know for certain if milk thistle has significantly helped me, but the research looks promising!

History

In 40-90 A.D., Dioscorides — a Greek surgeon that traveled with Roman emperor Nero — recommended milk thistle as a treatment for serpent bites. In the Middle Ages, milk thistle was used as medicine for liver toxicity. Among Native Americans, milk thistle is used to treat skin issues. According to the National Cancer Institute, some homeopathic practitioners use milk thistle to treat jaundice, gallstones, peritonitis, bronchitis, hemorrhage, and varicose veins.

Type 2 Diabetes

According to the University of Rochester Medical Center, milk thistle may help to reduce blood glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

Liver Issues: Hepatitis, Cirrhosis, Alcoholic Liver Disease, Mushroom Poisoning, and Tetrachloride Poisoning

Milk thistle is a powerful antioxidant that assists with the regeneration of liver cells. It has the potential ability to stop cirrhosis of the liver due to alcohol abuse or hepatitis.

Cancer

Milk thistle can stop the growth of some cancers and might make some chemotherapy drugs more effective.

Have you ever tried milk thistle? As always, when using supplements and herbs, remember to invest in the highest quality brands.

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References

Milk Thistle. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/hn-2130007#hn-2130007-how-it-works

Milk Thistle. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?contenttypeid=19&contentid=MilkThistle

Milk Thistle (PDQ): Health Professional Version. (2019). Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/26389223/?i=2&from=milk%20thistle&filters=BooksDocs