DIY: Foaming Hand Soap

In a previous article entitled Toxic House, I wrote about the harmful chemicals that are lurking in our homes. My family has been using safer, eco-friendlier products since 2012. To save money this past year, I started to make some of my own products. Here is a very easy recipe for foaming hand soap!

Here’s what you need:

  • Soap Dispenser with Foaming Pump 250 mL/8.5 oz
  • Castile soap: 2 tablespoons
  • Vegetable glycerin or olive oil: 3 generous splashes (optional)
  • Essential oils: 5 drops (optional)
  • Water

Here’s where you get:

  • Soap Dispenser with Foaming Pump 250 mL/8.5 oz: Amazon
  • Castile soap: Thrive Market
  • Vegetable glycerin or olive oil: Thrive Market
  • Essential oils: Email me at contact@inspirationforwellness.com for the highest quality oils!
  • Water: Use filtered water if desired

I used to buy body care and supplements on Amazon, but I don’t do that anymore because I can’t be sure that I am getting what I am paying for. I ended up in the hospital with a bad allergic reaction and I think it was due to tainted products that I bought on Amazon.

Here’s what you do: 

Pour the castile soap, vegetable glycerin and essential oils into your dispenser. Fill the rest of the bottle with water, but do not fill it to the top because you need room for the pump. Shake the ingredients. You’re done!

The vegetable glycerin is optional, but I have found that the soap dries out my skin without it. You can use olive oil, but if you do, be aware that the soap dispenser will have a very noticeable yellow substance floating around inside of it. Also, if you use a plastic soap dispenser with essential oils, please note that the essential oils might degrade the plastic over time. If you are using essential oils for your soap, I recommend ylang ylang or geranium. Ylang ylang contains beta-caryophyllene which is soothing for the skin and geranium contains citronellol which is also good for the skin. Many people also love lavender which contains linalyl acetate and linalool. These chemical compounds provide a calming aroma.

Do you make your own hand soap? What ingredients do you use?

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This post was originally published on December 13, 2018 and updated on September 12, 2019.

How To Use Roman Chamomile Essential Oil

I have never been a coffee lover, but I love tea—especially chamomile tea! A few months ago, I tried Roman Chamomile essential oil and it became one of my favorite oils. Chamomile is calming for the nervous system and helpful for the immune system. It is also soothing for the skin! Research articles on PubMed also show that chamomile can be used for hemorrhoids, carpal tunnel syndrome, and infant colic.

Aromatic Use

Throughout history, chamomile has been used to help with anxiety and has been used as a sleep aid. Chamomile has a beautiful, gentle, fruity smell. Need to relax after a long day? Place 2-3 drops (or more) in a diffuser, turn on some peaceful music, and put your feet up.

Topical Use

I use 1-2 drops of chamomile and lavender on my dry, itchy fingers. If you need help with calming your emotions, you can rub a couple of drops on your wrists, neck, or the backs of your feet.

Internal Use

When I had a cold a few months ago, I added 1-2 drops of Roman Chamomile oil, 1-2 drops of lemon oil, and honey into a mug of hot water. This tea was a sweet, soothing, immune-boosting tonic.

Email me at contact@inspirationforwellness.com for the purest essential oils!

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References

Adib-Hajbaghery, M. & Mousavi, N.S. (2017). The Effects of chamomile extract on sleep quality among elderly people: A Clinical Trial. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 35, 109-114. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965229917302601?via%3Dihub

Hashempur, M.H., Ghasemi, M.S., Daneshfard, B., Ghoreishi, P.S., Lari, Z.N., Homayouni, K., & Zargaran, A. (2017). Efficacy of topical chamomile oil for mild and moderate carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 26, 61-67. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1744388116300925?via%3Dihub

Srivastava, J.K., Shankar, E., & Gupta, S. (2010). Chamomile: A herbal medicine of the past with a bright future (Review). Molecular Medicine Reports, 3 (6), 895-901. https://www.spandidos-publications.com/mmr/3/6/895

Ten Essential Oils For Your Medicine Cabinet

When I discovered essential oils in 2018, I was so excited to use plant medicine—the last piece of the puzzle on my Natural Living journey! Are you searching for natural solutions that will help to eliminate the root causes of your signs and symptoms? Scroll down to read about ten oils that you should have in your medicine cabinet!

1. Lemon

Lemon oil is wonderful for cleansing the body and the house. One to two drops of lemon in water or tea will support the body’s detoxification process. It also has a great taste.

Feeling down? Lemon and other citrus oils can help uplift your mood!

2. Frankincense

The “King of Oils” is an amazing oil that can support all the cells of your body. Frankincense helps to restore the skin and promote feelings of peace. I use it on my baby’s irritated skin and in my night cream. I also take frankincense internally for extra support.

3. Melaleuca (Tea Tree)

Melaleuca is effective at cleaning my house, my skin and my nails.

15 drops of lemon oil, 15 drops of melaleuca, 1 cup of water and 1/2 cup of vinegar makes an effective, all-purpose cleaner!

4. Lavender

The “Swiss Army Knife” of essential oils is calming for the skin and the emotions. I used it on my children when they had hives and I currently rub it on my baby’s jawline when he is teething. To help my toddler wind down after a long day, I rub lavender on the back of her neck and on the bottoms of her feet.

5. Oregano

Oregano is a powerful oil that I take internally when I need a boost for my immune system. When my children are not feeling well, I also rub this potent oil on their feet.

6. Protective Blend

The Protective blend is another oil that can support your immune system. I take this oil internally and apply this topically on my children. This blend has an inviting aroma that is very pleasant to diffuse.

7. Respiratory Blend

When I need extra respiratory support, I rub this potent blend on my nose, chest or feet. At night, I like to diffuse this blend with frankincense—it’s a refreshing blend for easy breathing.

8. Digestive Blend

To be honest, the smell of this oil used to make me nauseous. Eventually, it became my “hero oil.” Whenever we have any kind of tummy trouble, this blend provides relief within seconds!

9. Peppermint

The smell of peppermint makes me want to get up and go! I like to rub peppermint oil on my neck for an instant cooling sensation. Peppermint can also be used for stomach upset and head tension. It has also been known to repel insects.

10. Soothing Blend

This blend provides relief and comfort. I like to rub this cooling blend on my forehead, neck, and wrists after a long day. After my husband’s CrossFit work-out, I rub this blend on his back and knee.

Do you need to give your medicine cabinet a makeover? Contact me for the purest oils!

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Essential Oils and Hair Restoration

I recently had lunch with a business contact who asked me if there were any clinical studies regarding essential oils and hair restoration. A search on PubMed for “essential oils and alopecia” revealed 14 hits–two out of these 14 hits peaked my interest.

The first study compared rosemary oil and a synthetic medication called minoxidil. The second study involved four essential oils: thyme, rosemary, lavender and cedarwood. The writers of both research articles concluded that essential oils were effective treatments for hair restoration.

According to the drug label on DailyMed, minoxidil will not work for everyone and unwanted side effects can occur after use. In contrast to synthetic medications which can cause unwanted side effects, natural essential oils produce side benefits. The smell of rosemary oil can help with concentration; thyme can be used to purify the skin; lavender can calm the emotions and soothe the skin; and cedarwood can assist with mood stabilization.

Contact me for the purest essential oils!

References

Hay, I.C., Jamieson, M., & Ormerod, A.D. (1998). Randomized trial of aromatherapy. Successful treatment for alopecia areata. Archives of dermatology, 134 (11), 1349-1352.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9828867

Panahi, Y., Taghizadeh, M., Marzony, E.T., & Sahebkar, A. (2015). Rosemary oil vs minoxidil 2% for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia: a randomized comparative trial. Skinmed, 13 (1), 15-21.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25842469

Lavender: the Swiss Army Knife of Essential Oils

During my last essential oils class, there was a lady in the front row that did not want to smell any of the oils. Before passing each oil onto the next person, she covered her hand with a napkin and said to me, “I’m sensitive to smells.”

A few days later, the same lady approached me and asked, “What was that one oil that I smelled before the class started? When I got home, I didn’t feel no pain!” I wasn’t sure which oil she was referring to, but I gave her a sample of lavender oil to try. A few days later, she bought a bottle of lavender oil and a diffuser-the lavender provided pain relief because it helped her to relax!

With the chemical components of linalyl acetate and linalool, lavender essential oil is widely known for its ability to calm emotions. It is also wonderful for the skin; it is useful to apply on burns, sunburns, cuts, hives and other skin imperfections. I rubbed it on my daughter’s legs when she broke out in hives. I also combined lavender with melaleuca, frankincense and coconut oil to make an effective “Owie Spray” that smells like sweet flowers!

Have you tried lavender oil, the “Swiss Army Knife of essential oils”? Contact me for the purest lavender oil!